Morocco

Learn to Cook Moroccan, in Essaouira

The coastal town of Essaouira has attracted a wealth of celebrities including Bob Marley and Jimi Hendrix, over the years, thanks to its chilled-out hippy vibes, bohemian shops, sandy beaches and burgeoning arts scene.  I was Gorging myself on an extravagant meal and I soaking up the relaxed atmosphere, when I decided then and there that I want to learn to cook like a Moroccan.

I choose sleek yet authentic L'Atelier Madada, a cooking workshop in the lofty grounds of boutique hotel Madada Mogador, to learn the craft. Read more about Learn to Cook Moroccan, in Essaouira

What's Left for October Half-Term?

Scorchio in summer, Morocco cools down for its autumnal peak season. Space is already limited for October half-term but specialist operator Naturally Morocco can tailor-make a three-stop itinerary beginning in the High Atlas mountains south of Marrakech. There you'll undertake a soft trek - with mules for the kids to hop astride when needed - to salt-mining villages and passes that will leave you gasping. Next comes a chance to ride camels along sand dunes around seaside Essaouira, before two days in Marrakech itself. Read more about What's Left for October Half-Term?

Explore the Wonders of North Africa

North Africa has some of the most exciting and exotic cultures and landscapes in the world. The region has an edgy energy - almost a breathless quality - about it: the intense, relentless heat; surreal, mystical labyrinthine souks and medinas, some of which look so unearthly they have been used in films set in space (some star wars scenes were set in Tunisia); ruins and temples scattered about the land like sweets waiting to be discovered afresh. Read more about Explore the Wonders of North Africa

Morocco's Best City Breaks

Morocco's cities are impossibly exotic. North African culture bumps up against all the quirks and traditions of the Middle East, leaving travellers caught up in haggling sessions for carpets, tripping over snake charmers' baskets, drinking scalding mint tea or getting lost in dark, maze-like souks. From the capital to the coast, there's plenty to discover in the urban hubs across the country. Here's our pick of the top spots to see. Read more about Morocco's Best City Breaks

A Short Break to Sunnier Climes

SEE WHALES BREACH ON THE GARDEN ROUTE IN SOUTH AFRICA
Strictly speaking the Garden Route is just a four-hour coastal drive along the southern edge of Africa, one end an afternoon’s drive from Cape Town, the other two hours from Port Elizabeth. But no other highway is this appealing. It boasts the world’s second mildest climate, losing out only to Hawaii. The year-round rain means that its ten national parks are bursting with flora and fauna: more than 300 species of birds, coral reefs, elephants, dolphins and several types of whale. Read more about A Short Break to Sunnier Climes

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Run One of the World's 10 Toughest Marathons

BADWATER 135, CALIFORNIA USA
Traditionally referred to as 'the world's toughest foot race', Badwater was forced to alter its traditional route through Death Valley in 2013.  The Death Valley Park authorities placed a ban on strenuous events taking place during the summer months, when air temperatures (in the shade) reach over 48 degrees.  So organisers came up with an alternative route, one with more than 5,200m of cumulative vertical ascent (compared to 3,962 in the previous route), and 3,900m of cumulative descent (compared to 1,433m).  While temperature might not reach the sizzling heights of Death Valley (ultra-runner Dean Karnazes once reported that between his team car handing him a cheese sandwich and him eating it, said sandwich became a toastie), the world's toughest foot race just got tougher.

Race facts: The race takes place in July; 135miles(217km); Maximum 48 hours, there is an entry fee. Read more about Run One of the World's 10 Toughest Marathons

Take a Golfing Short Break in Marrakech

There are a few corners of the globe that golf hasn’t managed to infiltrate, so it’s perhaps not surprising that Morocco, one of the world’s more westernised Muslim countries, has been bitten by the golfing bug.  Marrakech is spearheading Morocco’s bid to become a serious golf destination, with a dozen championship courses.  It’s fair to say this has little to do with finding the next Rory McIlroy – Moroccan youth only has eyes for football – but more with attracting the growing ranks of travelling golfers who will go almost anywhere for guaranteed sunshine and a half-decent links. Read more about Take a Golfing Short Break in Marrakech

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